Guardians of the Galaxy – Quality, Fun Throwback Action

Grade: B+

When the first Guardians of the Galaxy trailer came out, I watched it on a loop. It had jokes, fun characters, and intensely visual action – all set to cool 70s music. To say that it exceeded my expectations would be an understatement – I had never read a GOTG comic, and had barely heard of the team before the movie was announced. Brett White is right on Twitter – the promotional campaign did sum up the movie almost perfectly, the movie is what you would expect from the trailer.

Of course, those elements do not necessarily make for a perfect movie. In terms of pound for pound enjoyment, however, Guardians of the Galaxy is hard to beat; even in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, which was already characterised by the tone of joy and humour, few movies approach GOTG.

The opening sequence, set in 1988, is more somber than the rest of the movie, setting up the tragedy in Peter Quill’s past which ends up sending him into space. At the same time, it also hints at a reveal much later in the film which helps rationalise why, exactly, did this boy who’d grow up to be played by Chris Pratt, would be singled out to go into space and hang out with thieves. After that, however, the film launches directly into the plot, as 26 years later young Quill (who occasionally goes by Star Lord, to everyone’s amusement) is looking to steal a mysterious orb from an abandoned planet. It is difficult not to think of Indiana Jones as he deftly and joyfully infiltrates the location of the ancient artefact, only to have everything nearly go wrong when competitors try to take it away from him. It’s a great teaser for the rest of the movie – there is tension at times, to be sure, but it’s also handled with such genuine glee on the part of the filmmakers that it cannot but be infectious. This is the case even when there are glimpses of the fact that Quill is clearly a thief, and not the nicest guy in the Galaxy either despite ultimately wishing well. Han Solo comparisons are inevitable as well, and it’s ultimately rather nice that the movie is not being dragged down by a whiny Luke Skywalker archetype. He was, to be sure, necessary in Star Wars, and I am generally strongly in favour of more sincerity and less irony in cinema – but GOTG is unashamedly about a group of outlaws, and the tone of irreverence it strikes only serves the movie.

Of course, Peter Quill’s actions angers all the right humanoids. He comes on the radars of Rocket (the CGI raccoon voiced by Bradley Cooper) and Groot (Vin Diesel, the walking tree), who are looking to cash in on his bounty, and Gamora (assassin played by Zoe Saldana) who needs the orb he stole. The orb is evidently a highly sought-after item, and aside from complete coincidence, it is unclear how everyone became aware of it at once. The movie rather rightly does not concern itself too much with that, however. The four of them are captured and brought to prison, where they are joined by Drax the Destroyer (Dave Bautista) to escape and, ideally, get rich in the process.

The character motivations for the group of misfits is arguably one of the faults of the movie. Conversely to most movies of its ilk, where everything seems to make sense until you think about it, I occasionally did not find the characters’ reasons for sticking together believable, and considered it a flaw until after the movie, where I actually can see why everyone behaved as they did, mostly. It’s clear that the filmmakers, in particular the writers James Gunn (who also directed) and Nicole Perlman thought about the motivations, and dropped in just enough clues to explain them. It’s just that (almost certainly due to the jam-packed nature of the movie), it often seemed like there wasn’t enough time to really get into them. And it’s a shame, really! In a movie where the characters are almost certainly the best part of the whole thing, the interaction is ultimately left sort of light and surface-level, despite there being hints of greater motivation. They each have larger-than-life backstories, but the pain only ever comes out briefly, enough to suggest that there is something there without getting to really examine it or live in the emotion. Gamora hates Thanos, and with VERY good reason, but the range rarely actually comes through, for all her general attitude. Drax is burning for revenge, and yet when he fails to achieve it towards the end of the second act, there is barely a beat of him recognising his failure. This stuff matters – and the drama, the opera-level emotions are arguably what separates superhero movies from other action.

The other weak spot is the general plot. The saving of the Galaxy is important, sure, and there are other reasons for characters to move the plot along, but I just can’t escape the fact that I’ve more or less seen that a few times now, and without the real involvement in the motivations the plot just sort loses relevance. It isn’t bad in the slightest, mind you. It’s just that it’s… sort of standard. Ronin the Accuser, played by Lee Pace, and Karen Gillan’s Nebula are both menacing and interesting, but ultimately sort of thinly drawn. Ronin’s motivation is, once again, “destroying stuff”, despite mention of some injustice committed in his past. The comic book fans will appreciate seeing more of Thanos, but at the end of the day, he just kind of sits there, on apparently the same asteroid he was seen on in Avengers. Surely, there must be something more to his life than sitting on his throne and making threats? He is evidently the most dangerous being in the Galaxy, and it would have been nice to see more of that.

Now, it may sound like I’m coming down on Guardians of the Galaxy hard, but I want to make it absolutely clear that I LOVED the general experience of watching the film. The reason for that is undoubtedly the humour and the genuinely fun characters. Whatever other complaints I have are simply there because without those flaws, the film would actually be the masterpiece of comic-book storytelling that many people online claim it is, and that I believe Avengers to have been. Absolutely every one of the Guardians deserves every moment on the screen. Peter Quill is funny, and for all his posturing heroism – sometimes kind of a loser, which makes him relatable (I can’t imagine how insufferable he’d be without that). Gamora is intense and bad-ass, even if she does require saving from a man at least once too often (though to be fair, they each rely on saving from each other more than once). Rocket and Groot are a great odd couple, both scrappy bounty-hunting weirdos. Drax takes himself far too seriously, which causes Bautista to be funnier than he, frankly, has any right being (him struggling to understand metaphor yields some of the biggest laughs). Most importantly, though, they’re a joy to have on the screen together, which really is what you want in a team superhero movie. Their interaction is consistently not only funny, but generally kind of sweet. Rocket crying when Groot seems to be dead is probably the only moment, aside from the opening, that really pulls at your heart strings, but other stuff is not a loss. Quill explaining the concept of dancing to Gamora plays nicely, and is then instantly undercut by a joke to keep it from going too serious. Their prison escape uses action to establish character (which should always be the case with action, really, but here it’s particularly poignant as they’re really working together for the first time), all the while twisting tropes of heists in movies. I cannot think that at least a part of it is because not only James Gunn, but everyone involved, seems to be ecstatic to get to do the things they’re doing, to play with the toys they just received.

Then, of course, there are the visuals, which are absolutely stunning. While the action can occasionally be a little too shaky for my taste, the general environment of the film is imbued with so much beautiful colour that as a general rule, it is a true pleasure to watch. This is lacking in superhero cinema, which tends to be over-serious in tone and dark and bland in visuals (presumably to distance themselves from Batman & Robin). The genre has proven itself, though, and while the general trend in cinema in the 2000s was blacks and greys, I could not be happier that we’re moving away from it. What digital film offers us is clarity, crispness, and intense colour. I am overjoyed to see filmmakers make use of it (I know I keep going on about it, but the new Mad Max: Fury Road trailer does a great job of it). James Gunn pulls out all the stops to wow us with his vision of space, and it is genuinely beautiful – even when it’s grimy.

Overall, I had a whole lot of fun with Guardians of the Galaxy, and while I do think there were things that could be improved, that would probably have had to come at a cost of other things, which Guardians does beautifully, such as enjoyable, humorous, character moments and their fun romp through space. For what it’s worth, I am almost certainly seeing it again next week – and having a better idea, now, of the character motivations may mean I’ll actually enjoy it at least as much this time around. I’m not advocating that every superhero movie take on its tone – a good contrast would be this year’s much more earnest Captain America: The Winter Soldier. For this corner of the Marvel Universe, though, it really worked wonderfully. And if a talking raccoon is not crazy enough for you, be sure to stick around for the end-credits scene, which has little to do with the overall plot and structure of the universe at large, but is a great little wink-wink, nudge-nudge moment for the Marvel fans.

Trailer Tuesday: Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Every Tuesday, I will post a trailer I saw in the past week that I felt was worth sharing.

Finally, a superhero trailer worth sharing. Captain America: The Winter Soldier is my currently most anticipated superhero film of the coming year, far more so than Thor: The Dark World. To be fair, though, this is just my bias. Marvel has so far done a good job of differentiating their different superhero franchises in terms of genre, and I simply tend to like the international thriller/spy genre better than fantasy films – not that Thor doesn’t look good, which it does, largely due to the presence of fan-favorite Tom Hiddleston’s Loki.

Getting back to Cap, however. Chris Evans returns to the role of Steve Rogers/Captain America, as is Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow, Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury, and Sebastian Stan as Bucky Barnes (here returning under the guise of the titular Winter Soldier). The trailer showcases a possible rift within S.H.I.E.L.D., as Steve Rogers shows his disagreement with their policies.

We finally get a moving image of Anthony Mackie as the superhero and long partner to Cap, the Falcon, and we’re now able to get a better idea what his flight looks like. I have to say, it’s not the most believable looking – but then again, the concept isn’t very believable either. Falcon does not get much screen time in the trailer, and neither does the supposedly central villain, Winter Soldier, who despite that still gets to do cool bad-guy stuff as he antagonizes a freeway and catches the Captain’s shield.

The movie is directed Anthony and Joe Russo, previously known for their work on sitcoms, such as Community. Considering the fact that most of the action is typically to fully orchestrated by the directors in these films anyways, technical expertise in shooting action is probably not required, whereas the sitcom experience will help them capture the character and humor that the Marvel franchises have become known for.

Overall, all of the fandom aside, it’s just a cool trailer for an action movie that looks exciting, and worth seeing. Captain America: The Winter Soldier comes out in March of next year.

Casting Friday: Ant-Man News, Hunham out of Shades, Larson in Gambler

Each Friday, I will summarize the important casting news or rumors from the preceding week, giving you a preview of who’ll be playing who in the future!

JGL & Rudd as Ant-Man

Variety reported this week that the hotly anticipated Marvel Cinematic Universe Phase 3 film Ant-Man is close to being cast: the role now evidently comes down to either Joseph Gordon-Levitt or Paul Rudd.

According to the Variety article that broke the story, the two actors are set to meet with Marvel execs before a final decision is made.

The two actors are 12 years apart in age. Levitt already has experience in comic adaptations, appearing in last year’s Dark Knight Rises, as well as next year’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For.  The film would, however, be a departure for Paul Rudd, whose career has so far been marked mostly by comedy.

The film is set to be the first of the Phase 3 films, to follow Avengers 2: Age of Ultron on July 31st, 2015. Edgar Wright is directing the film, co-written with Joe Cornish, whose directorial debut Attack the Block made waves in 2011.

Rashida Jones as the Wasp

This is not the last of the Ant-Man news to surface this week, however: according to Superhero Movie News, casting is underway for the titular hero’s wife and super hero Janet van Dyne, a.k.a. the Wasp. According to the site’s source, she will not appear in her superhero identity, but will play the love interest.

Currently, the rumor is that Rashida Jones, best known for her role in Parks & Recreation. Her co-star Chriss Pratt is already appearing in Guardians of the Galaxy as Peter Quill, Star Lord.

She is reportedly being chosen due to her chemistry with Paul Rudd, who may play Hank Pym, Ant-Man himself. The two appeared together in Our Idiot Brother and I Love You Man.

While the Wasp will reportedly not perform any superheroics herself in the film, she reportedly is planned to do so in later films (likely Avengers 3).

The Wasp has already been seen in the Marvel Cinematic Universe in the recently released initial animatics for the first Avengers, a still from which can be seen below:

Hunham Out of Shades

Charlie Hunham is evidently no longer interested in becoming the universe’s most desirable male, as he has left the lead  in Fifty Shades of Grey which was all but certain guarantee of that.

While there is no hard fact on the reason for this move, the rumor is that he was refused “extensive creative input”, which he was seeking in the form of script approval. Other speculation involves him not being popular with the franchise’s fans (a petition to remove him from the project received over 88 thousand signatures as of now). The official reason is that his television commitment to Sons of Anarchy  was simply too demanding, but logic dictates that he would have been aware of those well before initially agreeing to star in the picture.

Brie Larson in Gambler

Brie Larson (Scott Pilgrim vs the World, 21 Jump Street) is set to appear alongside Mark Wahlberg in the upcoming The Gambler, a remake of the 1974 James Caan original.

The remake is currently rumored to be directed by Rupert Wyatt, who previously did the fantastically engaging Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

Casting Friday: Giamatti Rhino, Olsen Avengers

Each Friday, I will summarize the important casting news or rumors from the preceding week, giving you a preview of who’ll be playing who in the future!

Giamatti Rhino

While The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is yet to come out (it is scheduled for May 2nd, 2014), actor Paul Giamatti, who plays the villain Rhino in the film, already confirmed his appearance in The Amazing Spider-Man 3. The film is currently slated to be released on June 10th, 2016. Whatever else could be said about this news, it is definitely a spoiler for the second film.

In the same interview, Giamatti said he does not know whether he will be appearing in the 4th film of the franchise, also already greenlit. He did not reveal anything further about the rumors of a Sinister Six team-up in upcoming films.

Olsen Avengers

I’ve previously talked about the rumor of Olsen playing Scarlet Witch in Avengers 2: Age of Ultron, but there has been no confirmation of it until now. Granted, the quote does not specifically mention the role, but Samuel L. Jackson, who of course is playing Nick Fury in the film, confirmed that she is involved:

“I don’t think we begin shooting before March of next year. I know we’re shooting in London, that James Spader is Ultron and going to be the bad guy, and that we added Ms. [Elizabeth] Olsen, but I don’t know what she’s doing, if she’s on the inside or the outside. I haven’t seen a script.”

Not many more casting news this week. I, for one, am waiting for news on who’s playing Constantine in the upcoming tv pilot!

Week of Superhero Television – In-Development Series

The second episode to Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (AoS) is airing tonight, and like most superhero enthusiasts, I’m fairly excited to see it. While the series’ successful is definitely a big headline of the past week, possibly far more intriguing are the news of in-development television series based on comic book properties.

Initially, a week before AoS debuted, rumors started circulating about a potential deal in the making for an upcoming Agent Carter television series. To those unfamiliar to the character, she was portrayed by Hayley Atwell in 2011 Captain America: The First Avenger as the female lead/love interest, and was the focus of a Agent Carter, short for the Iron Man 3 DVD, which I have not seen, but heard great things about. Considering the series would likely pick up after Captain America’s “accident”, and before the creation of S.H.I.E.L.D., one can see why Marvel would look to the property as a valuable connective property. This would allow the rather exciting opportunity of having a prequel to AoS airing at the same time as the Clark Gregg-lead show.

There has been no indication, as of yet, what network would pick up the series, or if Holly Atwell is involved in any capacity, but ABC would be the logical choice, considering it is already the home for AoS.

I won’t gloss over the most important aspect of these news, however, as the series would represent a major comic-based television property headed by a woman. Neither Marvel nor DC have had a major female-lead film since 2005’s Elektra, and 2004’s Catwoman, both of which proved to be major box office and critical flops and seemed to scare producers away from superheroines. This series being aired could be a major push in the right direction.

Not to be forgotten, DC also announced a new television series. They are already preparing a back-door pilot for a Flash television series in the form of Arrow‘s season 2 finale, but they are evidently determined to not be out-done in a week where Marvel is dominating television news. Originally, early last week the buzz on the internet spoke of a long-talked-about Gotham Central series, based on the comic by Ed Brubaker. The actual news is that a show based around a young Jim Gordon, as a Gotham city detective, currently entitled Gotham is currently in production. There are very few details available at this time, but the most interesting piece is that the series commitment is at Fox. This is puzzling, as Arrow and The Flash are both airing on CW, owned by DC’s parent company Time Warner. Before this announcement, it appeared that DC was setting up a separate continuity for their CW shows, but it is difficult to imagine any sort of tie-in with the Fox-based Gotham series.

The surprise was doubled when yet another network made a deal for a DC character last week – namely, NBC bought, under penalty if the pilot doesn’t air, the rights to a John Constantine television series (currently titled Constantine). It is difficult to speculate what direction the television series will take, but considering the timing, it is reasonable to expect that it will take its tone from the currently running comic by the same name. John Constantine is my all-time favorite comic book character, but it’s the older Hellblazer incarnation that I’m a huge fan of. The newer version regularly has disproportionately powerful magical abilities, which I suppose is the major complaint I have about the currently running series. As a consequence, the character is lazier, brashly rushing into situations with little preparation. Where he does prepare, it’s used by writer as nothing more than deus ex machina: “I was prepared for this! I totally was! I cast a spell before I showed up!” Somewhere along the line, it was forgotten that John is absolutely not a superhero, but a supernatural conman. He doesn’t like to get his hands dirty, and certainly doesn’t have any D&D wizard-type spells, he deals in trickery and forethought. I was heartbroken when Hellblazer, at that time the longest-running comic for either Marvel or DC, was cancelled after issue 300. Few things would make me happier than a good Constantine television series, but I’m cautious to say the least.

The television series is not the only Constantine project currently in the works – Guillermo del Toro is reportedly working on a Justice League Dark film, in which the chain-smoking magical conman is set to appear. Del Toro said that “Constantine is our lead… the guy who leads us in and out of the plot.” He also said in a different interview that “Constantine is such a great character, so dry.” Once again, those quotes give me hope. Maybe del Toro does get the character, and maybe he’ll do a fantastic job! The series he’s basing the movie on, however, Justice League Dark, is sadly not great. It’s one of those series I keep returning to because of the characters, only to be disappointed every time with stories I fail to find even remotely compelling. Guillermo is notorious for juggling numerous projects at once.

The proposed television series is, once again, at NBC, which is yet another network that is set to air a DC-based show. It seems very unlikely that any sort of continuity would ever be established between these competing companies’ offerings, but maybe that’s not a terrible thing. I believe Arrow and The Flash could benefit from the shared continuity. In fact, I’m almost always in favor of continuity. Constantine, however, along with Gotham, may actually work better as stand-alones. AoS and Agent Carter presumably will share a world, along with the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Unless DC has some as of yet unrevealed plan for an overarching universe, it seems they are content with simply using their characters as before, while placing all of their hopes into the upcoming Man of Steel sequel. Which, I won’t argue, is looking cool.

Week of Superhero Television – Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Last Tuesday’s airing of the pilot of the new Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D (AOS) series was undoubtedly one of the biggest television events of this season. It represents, at the very least, an escalation in the mainstream comics’ arms race, with Marvel decisively striking a blow with a major television series linked in to their universe. The idea is not new, of course, but after 2012’s phenomenally successful release of The Avengers, everyone expected this new show to be a big deal.

Marvel characters have been noticeably absent from live-action television since 2006’s Blade, which marked the time just before the beginning of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Disney’s decision to not put shows on tv based on the characters could be explained by a desire to not muddle their continuity, choosing rather to build it out more deliberately. AOS’ early ratings success seems to be a sign the strategy paid off – the pilot episode aired to the highest ratings for a series debut in nearly four years.

The nature of a television series, however, means that a strong opening is not enough for a successful show. Does ABC have the building blocks in the pilot series to sustain the numbers?

Having, naturally, only seen the pilot and not any of the subsequent episodes, I would hazard a guess that they do. Obviously, Whedon has his hands full and will not be able to write and direct each of the subsequent episodes as he did the pilot, but as fans we couldn’t expect him to – after all, the man is currently working on Avengers 2: Age of Ultron, which is probably just about tied for the most anticipated upcoming superhero film. We can expect Whedon’s less direct involvement to force the show’s likeability to take a hit. Recent rumors indicated that the poor quality of some upcoming episodes’ scripts forced the man to do page-one rewrites hours before table reads, but the showrunners Maurissa Tancharoen and Jed Whedon (as differentiated from his brother, Joss Whedon, who wrote and directed the pilot) have since denied the rumors to Hollywood Reporter. Sceptics will cry that “of course they would”, but after a similar situation where Whedon was recently asked to step in for rewrites of problematic scenes in Thor: The Dark World, the director Alan Taylor talked about it openly. Granted, Whedon has a reputation for being a script doctor (legend has it, Whedon fixed the ending for Marvel’s Civil War in 10 minutes, simply stopping in en-route to a different office). One has to hope the writing staff for the show will be able to stand up on their own two feet without relying on him.

Regardless of speculation, the first episode is simply good. I am a poor viewer of television, possibly due to being spoiled to seeing bigger things in the cinema… But the show never disappointed. The dialogue, as we would expect, was punchy and clever, only occasionally straying into cheese (which can just as easily be attributed to the cast, which I’ll talk about later). Visually, the show varies between standard sets, to film-quality action scenes. The episode opens on a fight that would be impressive to see anywhere, as if to allay any concerns anyone might have about production vallue. Neither does the show allow itself to stray too far from the subject matter presumably everyone showed up for – superheroes are at the core of the show, despite not being in the main cast.

I had actually forgotten, it seems, how likeable Clark Gregg actually is in the role of Agent Coulson. His lines pop, his very first appearance in the show is dramatic, yet immediately undercut by a joke. Neither, however, does he shy away from the more intense scenes when his leadership role requires it. Agent Ward, portrayed by Brett Dalton so far seems to be a wet blanket, but as the physically most capable member of the team, one can only hope he will become less of a hard-ass while retaining the role of the resident action-man. Fitz and Simmons (Caestecker and Henstridge) had very little to do in the pilot episode, but could be fun. Ming-Na Wen ‘s character Melinda May hints at emotional depth, but that aspect of the character has not been adequately explored so far. This leaves us with Chloe Bennet in the role of Skye, who despite my immediate annoyance at her character early won me over by being funny and self-deprecating while remaining strong. If given too strong a focus, I feel the character does not have the juice to carry the scene, as is exemplified in the early narration by the character which simply, in my mind, does not work very well. In a team setting, however, she really is likeable. If the pilot were a film, I would say the characters are underdevelopped, but as it stands I remain hopeful the further episodes will take care of that.

I will not reveal the particulars of the plot of the show, nor how Agent Coulson is alive – I will simply say that there are hints the truth on that matter is not completely settled. As to the plot of the show, it does seem to take on an episodic “case of the week” structure, which I like. J. August Richards was very strong as the focus of the pilot. It is unclear whether his character will make any further appearances in the series.

This column was also supposed to cover the past few weeks of rumors and news for upcoming television series, but I will instead cover those topics in a later post, so stay tuned for that. For now, I will only say that DC’s approach is definitely very different, and while a lot is happening on that side of the Great Comics Divide, we have to question which strategy will ultimately prove to be more successful. Only time will tell, of course.

San Diego Comic Con-Exclusive Posters Revealed

San Diego Comic Con International 2013 has just begun. Below are some of the coolest CCI-exclusive posters that were released for some upcoming movies.

First up is Marvel’s Cinematic Universe. The next two movies to come out for them are Thor: The Dark World, set to come out November, and Captain America: The Winter Soldier next April. Below are the posters being handed out for free to con-goers this weekend.  

Captain America: The Winter Soldier CCI Poster; Image Courtesy of comicbookresources.com

Captain America: The Winter Soldier CCI Poster;
Image Courtesy of comicbookresources.com

Thor: The Dark World CCI Poster; Image courtesy of comicbookresources.com

Thor: The Dark World CCI Poster;
Image courtesy of comicbookresources.com

The Thor poster was created by Charlie Wen, and the Captain America by Ryan Meinerding, both veterans of Marvel CU. As both are drawn, they are, at best, artist renderings of what we may expect from the film. Winter Soldier’s prominence on the poster gives us a good idea, however, what we might expect from the character’s portrayal by Sebastian Stan.

While we are still waiting for Edgar Wright’s addition to the Marvel canon with Ant Man, slated for a 2015 release, we do have The World’s End from him for the end of the summer. The movie will be the end for the acclaimed, and very funny, Cornetto trilogy, so anticipation is high.  

The World's End CCI Poster; Image courtesy of denofgeek.com

The World’s End CCI Poster;
Image courtesy of denofgeek.com

Finally, we have two posters for next year’s Godzilla, from director Gareth Edwards, who previously brought us the great independent giant monster movie simply titled Monsters in 2010. Obviously tapped for the job due to the aptitude he showed there in handling human story against the backdrop of really big creatures, Edwards’ version of the King of Monsters already looks far superior than the 1998 Roland Emerich version.

Godzilla Poster for CCI; Image Courtesy of comicbooknews.com

Godzilla Poster for CCI;
Image Courtesy of comicbooknews.com

 

Godzilla CCI Poster; Image courtesy of liveforfilms.com

Godzilla CCI Poster;
Image courtesy of liveforfilms.com

As a bonus feature, see below for a picture of Godzilla from the CCI exhibit. While it is not necessarily an exact representation of what the creature will look like in the film, it does give us an idea. It definitely looks a lot closer to his Japanese roots than the dinosaured-up version from the 1998 remake.

Godzilla Encounter in CCI; Image Courtesy of collider.com

Godzilla Encounter in CCI;
Image Courtesy of collider.com

Which of these movies are you most excited for? Let me know in the comments!